New YMCA Housing Background Info & Plans, Friday 14th December at YMCA

The Plans

Here are the details of the plans which many of you have already received in the post. Some of you weren’t able to attend the events at the White Horse or the Manor Rooms, can attend an event on FRIDAY 14th December 2012 at the YMCA in Trowse.

If you cant attend the event on 14th, feel free to email comments to lewis.matthews@larondewright.co.uk or contact La Ronde Wright, No 4 The Close, Norwich NR1 4DH.

Here’s the plans, click to enlarge..

 

 

 

Thanks to your local councillor Trevor Lewis for details on the following.

NEW HOUSING – WHERE WE ARE AND HOW WE GOT THERE

MAY GURNEY SITE

This is already zoned for 100 houses (as well as a new HQ for May Gurney). A planning application for the houses was lodged some time ago. We are told that the developers have a solution for the overhead grid lines. South Norfolk Council planners are still not happy with the detailed layout proposed, and negotiations with the developers continue. However, the principle of housing development on this site is accepted.

THE DEAL GROUND

This is mainly in Norwich City, and City planners are understood to be satisfied with most of the proposals for 600 new homes – including having seven-storey blocks of flats. This may be coming to a City Planning Committee, at which we must argue strongly the negative effects on Trowse, including traffic on The Street and Martineau Lane roundabout.

NORFOLK HOMES SITE OFF WHITE HORSE LANE

ARMINGHALL SETTLEMENT SITE OFF HUDSON AVENUE

Both of these sites were proposed by South Norfolk Council earlier this year for up to 250 houses. Many of us have responded to that proposal, noting the schooling and landscape protection policies issues. These responses are what has caused South Norfolk Council to look again at it before making a final proposal for where houses will be built.

In the mean time, the Arminghall Settlement and Norfolk Homes have separately publicised their plans for developing these sites. These are not yet planning applications, but planning applications are likely to follow very quickly. As is happening elsewhere in the District, developers are putting in planning applications for sites the Council has provisionally identified for housing development. When, as at present, there is not a five-year supply of building land in the area, it is very difficult for such applications to be resisted. By all means respond to these developers, but the important response will be to the planning applications when they are lodged. We hope in the mean time that South Norfolk will reverse or at least modify its ambition for 250 houses to be built here. Naturally, I will be on the case.


An update from your District Councillor

TREVOR LEWIS

SOME GOOD NEWS – SOUTH NORFOLK COUNCIL HAS STARTED TO LISTEN TO OUR CONCERNS ABOUT 250 NEW HOMES

Last month, the Cabinet of South Norfolk agreed draft new policies against which planning applications for new development will be judged. These were to go out to public consultation, but they rang alarm bells with me – they showed that the Council proposed to take away one, possibly two, landscape policies that until now have protected the village against housing development.

With other Liberal Democrat Councillors, I ‘called-in’ the Cabinet’s decision, which meant that these changes would be reviewed at a meeting of the Council’s Scrutiny Committee on Wednesday 12th December. Council officers have responded positively, and effectively have agreed what was sought – namely that the protection policy boundaries are reviewed again.

THIS MEANS THAT THE CALL-IN HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN AND WILL NOT NOW COME TO THE SCRUTINY COMMITTEE MEETING – IF YOU HAD HEARD ABOUT THIS AND PLANNED TO ATTEND, THERE IS NOW NO NEED.

Landscape protection zones are just one element of whether Trowse will get more new housing. I have learned that both the District Council and the County Council now appreciate that the the fact that Trowse Primary School is full cannot expand puts a question mark over the development of sites in Trowse. It might not prevent further housing, but it might restrict it.

Overall, South Norfolk Council has agreed to take a much closer look at what it has proposed for Trowse before finalising the plans on which it will go out for a last public consultation in 2013. Common sense may prevail! In addition, local resident Matt Bailey is organising an action group – he’s at 7 Highland Crescent, Matt@MBMC-UK.com and 07890 918412.

 

 

 

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